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Flower Corsage Tutorial

Notice that I began with smaller flower heads and now, towards the eventual center of the corsage, I use the largest focal flower, which is a small rose head.

Place this head a little more centered, with just a slight angle to the right.  The goal is to have a natural spray of the flowers without looking "too precise".

I taped another small cluster of berries off the the right and under this rose head.

Take note as marked with the red arrows how the flower heads point outwards from the center line of the corsage.  I've added a second yellow rose at the bottom and this one has a definite turn of the head to the right.

Don't get too carried away with adding too many flowers.  This is going to be a double sided corsage with a bow in the center.  I always try to keep the wearer's size in mind when I create corsages and boutonnieres.

You certainly don't want to give the same size corsage to a tiny flower girl that you would design for pinning on the shoulder of a large, grown woman.

Add in any extra filler or berries if you feel they are needed.  Do not go overboard.  You can quickly overpower a corsage design with too much filler flower.  Keep it light and airy, always complementary to the focal flowers.

For contrast I'm adding some brightly dyed chrysanthemums.  Notice I can easily bend the flower face forward since I've taken the time to wire the flowers.  The natural stems are stiff and would snap and break or awkwardly forcing the flower head upwards rather than to the side.

I nestled this secondary flower head right between the two rose heads, facing the flower forward.

You can see I added another dyed cushion mum under the second rose head as well.  I felt like there was a "hole" in the design and tucked a flower into that spot.

Spray this portion of the corsage with Finishing Touch and lay to the side to dry as you create the bottom half of your corsage.

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